Tag Archives: DE

Department of Commerce

Department of Commerce

National Marine Fisheries Service of the Department of Commerce

In line with Katherine B. Killoran

about Department of Commerce in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The mission of National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), sometimes referred to as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries, is to develop and enforce domestic fisheries regulations as specified by federal law, international agreements, and treaties. NMFS monitors both foreign and domestic compliance with these regulations inside the 200-mile United States Exclusive Economic Zone. The NMFS is committed to a sustainable use philosophy that attempts to balance commercial interests and recreational interests while preserving the health of United States marine resources. The NMFS Office for Law Enforcement (OLE) protects both commercial and recreational fishery resources, marine mammals, and other threatened or endangered species and manages the NOAA's 13 National Marine Sanctuaries. The NMFS receives an annual budget of approximately $700 million, with more than $50 million earmarked for enforcement and surveillance activities.

Defense Criminal Investigative Service

Defense Criminal Investigative Service

Defense Criminal Investigative Service

In line with Deborah L. Sawers

about Defense Criminal Investigative Service in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Established in 1981, the Defense Criminal Investigative Service (DCIS) is the investigative arm of the United States Department of Defense (DoD) Inspector General. The original Inspector General Act of 1978 did not call for an Inspector General for the DoD, but later amendments did. Headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, DCIS is a civilian law enforcement agency that employs about 400 criminal investigators and support staff and has offices in more than 40 cities throughout the United States of America and Europe. DCIS special agents have the authority to make arrests, execute search warrants, and serve subpoenas. Additionally, they conduct interviews and appear as witnesses before grand juries, at criminal and civil trials, and at administrative proceedings.

Department of Justice

Department of Justice

Department of Justice

In line with Katherine M. Newbold

about Department of Justice in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Department of Justice (DOJ), an agency of the judiciary branch of the federal government, is headed by the United States attorney general (AG), who reports directly to the president of the United States of America and is a cabinet-level officer. The mission of the DOJ has expanded considerably since its creation, and now includes, To enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States of America according to the law; to ensure public safety against the threats foreign and domestic; to provide federal leadership in preventing and controlling crime; to seek just punishment for those guilty of unlawful behavior; administer and enforce the nation's immigration laws fairly and effectively; and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. DOJ is similar to a major law firm with divisions of attorneys with identified areas of expertise.

Detectives

Detectives

Detectives

In line with William F. McCarthy

about Detectives in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Police departments throughout the United States of America who assign police officers to perform retroactive investigations (investigating past crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) and collecting evidence) are called detectives; investigators; or, less frequently, inspectors. Detectives are also engaged in undercover operations, electronic surveillance, decoys, stings, and stakeouts in order to investigate continuing criminal enterprises. They are usually appointed to this detective designation, rather than promoted as the result of a competitive civil service exam process, which is the common promotion method for sergeant, lieutenant, and captain. The process for promotion to detective can range from a formal career path, evaluation of arrest activity, training, and education, to an abrupt instant reward for a heroic act or for solving an important or highly publicized case. The position of detective is the most celebrated, romanticized, and televised activity in the field of policing.

Department of Homeland Security

Department of Homeland Security

Department of Homeland Security

In line with Donald J. Rebovich

about Department of Homeland Security in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In the days immediately following the terrorist attacks against the United States of America on September 11, 2001, the nation was witness to a quick succession of official acts taken by the federal government to help prevent further such catastrophes. These acts included a presidential proclamation of a state of national emergency, the presidential authorization of the Use of Military Force bill, and the speedy establishment of 94 antiterrorism task forces throughout the country, one for each United States attorney office. Probably the most striking and far-reaching action taken by the administration of President George W. Bush in the wake of the events of September 11, 2001, was the presidential announcement to Congress of the creation of the Office of Homeland Security, with ex-governor of Pennsylvania Tom Ridge as its director.

Devenpeck v. Alford

Devenpeck v. Alford

Devenpeck v. Alford as a Leading U.S. Case

Devenpeck v. Alford is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Devenpeck v. Alford may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Devenpeck v. Alford tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Devenpeck v. Alford is also explained, together with the relevance of Devenpeck v. Alford impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Devenpeck v. Alford

543 U.S. 146 (2004)

Death Penalty

Death Penalty

Federally Eligible Crimes for Death Penalty

In line with Janice K. Dunham

about Death Penalty in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The federal government, as well as the individual state governments, can impose the death penalty. It can impose a death sentence in federal courts or in military court under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. American (United States) Indian courts try capital cases if the crime is committed on tribal land. If a capital crime is subject to both state and federal jurisdiction, the federal court takes precedence, although this does not deny the state's right to prosecute. The president of the United States of America is the only source of clemency for federal capital crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary). In the modern era, murder is the preeminent capital crime. All capital punishment jurisdictions take the offense of murder and surround it with a variety of special circumstances that make it a death-eligible offense. Murder can be capital or noncapital. The surrounding special circumstances create the possibility for execution.

Department of Energy

Department of Energy

Nuclear Security of the Department of Energy

In line with Marvie Brooks

about Department of Energy in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The security of nuclear materials in the United States of America is assigned to the Office of Security in the Department of Energy (DOE), which protects facilities, personnel, and classified and sensitive materials from threats from criminals, dissidents, terrorists, and security breaches via foreign intelligence. The plants and laboratories managed by DOE are located throughout the United States of America, including facilities in Nevada, New Mexico, California, and Tennessee and the agency's headquarters in Washington, D.C. The Office of Security is divided into a number of areas, including identification of classified and controlled information; executive and dignitary protection; infrastructure security to protect critical assets, including nuclear materials; and an emergency management center located at the Forrestal Emergency Operations Center at the Washington, D.C., headquarters, from which analytical support is provided during all security-related incidents and all emergency management drills and practice exercises.

Department of Health and Human Services

Department of Health and Human Services

Department of Health and Human Services

In line with Amie R. Scheidegger

about Department of Health and Human Services in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) was established in 1980 to protect the health of all Americans and provide health-related services to the public. By 2003, HHS was the largest grant-making agency in the federal government, representing the nation's largest health insurance program (Medicare) and overseeing more than 300 federally funded health- and service-related programs. HHS's budget for 2003 was reported to be $502 billion, the majority of which ($413 billion) was devoted to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). This division of HHS is responsible for administering Medicare and Medicaid programs, which provide health insurance for elderly and disabled persons (Medicare) and works with state agencies to provide medical services and health insurance for low-income citizens of all ages (Medicaid). Part of administering these programs includes investigating fraudulent practices associated with Medicare and Medicaid.

Delaware v. Prouse

Delaware v. Prouse

Delaware v. Prouse as a Leading U.S. Case

Delaware v. Prouse is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Delaware v. Prouse may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Delaware v. Prouse tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Delaware v. Prouse is also explained, together with the relevance of Delaware v. Prouse impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Delaware v. Prouse

440 U.S. 648 (1979)