Tag Archives: FE

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Federal Bureau of Investigation

In line with Joseph W. Koletar

about Federal Bureau of Investigation in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the investigative arm of the Department of Justice and has the widest jurisdiction of any federal law enforcement agency. It is the primary agency for the investigation of more than 200 federal statutes and also collects evidence in any cases in which the United States government is a litigant or an interested party, including both criminal and civil matters.

National Academy of the Federal Bureau of Investigation

In line with Stephen E. Ruegger

about Federal Bureau of Investigation in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Since its inception in 1935, the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Academy (FBINA) has provided advanced law enforcement training to police officers from around the world. The National Academy, wellknown throughout policing by the acronym FBINA, strives to improve professionalism, knowledge, and leadership training for law enforcement officers not only in the United States of America, but from foreign countries as well. The NA offers coursework to about 1,000 students annually through four training sessions each year on site at the FBI Training Facility in Quantico, Virginia. More than 36,000 officers, including 2,300 international officers representing 149 countries, are FBINA graduates.

Fernandez v. California

Fernandez v. California

Fernandez v. California as a Leading U.S. Case

Fernandez v. California is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Fernandez v. California may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Fernandez v. California tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Fernandez v. California is also explained, together with the relevance of Fernandez v. California impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Fernandez v. California

571 U.S. —, No. 12-7822 (2014)

Federal Aviation Administration

Federal Aviation Administration

Federal Aviation Administration

In line with Frances Sherertz

about Federal Aviation Administration in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is a subordinate agency of the Department of Transportation (DOT). It was originally established by the Federal Aviation Act of 1958. The FAA is one of the largest agencies in the United States of America and has a broad span of aviation control including regulatory and procurement functions and operational responsibilities. It has more than 48,000 employees and had a fiscal year 2003 budget of approximately $14 billion. The FAA's chief executive is its administrator, who is appointed by the president of the United States of America for a five-year term and confirmed by the Senate. Prior to 2002, the FAA had responsibility for civil aviation security, which it regulated through airport and air carrier security programs. The FAA also had an active Federal Air Marshal Program.

Fellers v. United States

Fellers v. United States

Fellers v. United States as a Leading U.S. Case

Fellers v. United States is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Fellers v. United States may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Fellers v. United States tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Fellers v. United States is also explained, together with the relevance of Fellers v. United States impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Fellers v. United States

540 U.S. 519 (2004)

Federal Maritime Commission

Federal Maritime Commission

Federal Maritime Commission

In line with Aviva Twersky-Glasner

about Federal Maritime Commission in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) was established in 1961 as an independent government agency, responsible for the regulation of shipping in the foreign trades of the United States of America. Its five members are appointed by the president of the United States of America, with the advice and consent of the Senate. The FMC's jurisdiction encompasses many facets of the maritime industry. Its duties and regulatory powers include protecting United States shippers, carriers, and others engaged in foreign commerce from restrictive rules and regulations of foreign governments and from the practices of foreign-flag carriers that have an adverse effect on shipping in United States trades.

Federal Policing in Indian Country

Federal Policing in Indian Country

Federal Policing in Indian Country

In line with Dorothy H. Bracey

about Federal Policing in Indian Country in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Native Americans have a unique relationship with the government of the United States of America. On the one hand, tribes are considered sovereign nations that enjoy a government-to-government relationship with federal authorities. On the other hand, Indians are considered wards of the government whose assets must be held in trust for them. The tension between these two views of Indian nations affects every aspect of their government. Law enforcement is a prominent example. Chapter 18, section 1151 of the United States of America Code defines Indian Country as any land granted by treaty or allotment to Nations, tribes, reservations, communities, colonies, or individuals and recognized as such by the federal government. Today there are close to 300 federally recognized reservations and communities. Relocation policies dating from the 1800s have caused some reservations to be shared by two or more tribes.

Federal Jurisdiction

Federal Jurisdiction

Federal Jurisdiction about Crimes

In line with Mary Gibbons

about Federal Jurisdiction in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Both the state and the federal governments have the authority to define conduct as criminal as well as to prosecute and punish such conduct. The authority of the federal government to establish federal crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) is found in the United States Constitution, which identified, or enumerated, certain powers to be within the province of the federal government, while reserving all other powers to the state governments. This fundamental principle underlying the division of authority between federal government and the states is reflected in the traditional distinctions between their separate spheres of criminal jurisdiction. Although states exercise a general criminal jurisdiction based on the common law system, the federal government, and the federal judiciary in particular, is limited to acting upon authority of the United States Constitution and acts of Congress in furtherance of the United States Constitution. Federal crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) are prosecuted in the federal court system. The United States Constitution established a United States

Federal Drug Seizure System

Federal Drug Seizure System

Federal Drug Seizure System

In line with Aviva Twersky-Glasner

about Federal Drug Seizure System in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Federal Drug Seizure System is the power of the federal government to seize property if it is used, or intended to be used, in any manner or part, to commit or to facilitate the commission of a drug crime. Federal drug seizure statutes were first enacted by Congress in 1970. However, it was the passage of the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984, part of the increased focus on the War on Drugs during the administration of President Ronald Reagan, that significantly strengthened the abilities of the government to seize property or assets if there was probable cause to assume that the property or asset in question was being used for the commission of drug crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary).

Federal

Federal

Federal

In line with The Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS) was established in 1963 as a forum for academic researchers and those in the criminal justice professions to focus on the study of crime and criminal behavior. Consistent with its initial purpose, ACJS remains a strong influential body that shapes criminal justice education, research, and policy analyses by promoting professional and scholarly activities in the field of criminal justice. Criminal justice education, research, and policy are the foci of the organization. ACJS supports the only journal dedicated to criminal justice education, has developed a set of minimum standards for criminal justice programs, and has established an academic peer review committee that conducts program reviews of criminal justice departments and programs. Debates have also centered on the merits of having criminal justice programs accredited.

about Federal in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

In line with Candido Cubero

about Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC), established in 1970 as a bureau of the Department of the Treasury, is the primary organization for training all federal law enforcement personnel. It provides basic and advanced training to uniformed and investigatory personnel employed by more than 75 federal law enforcement agencies. Throughout the 1990s, FLETC graduated about 25,000 students annually. In 2003, FLETC was moved from the Department of the Treasury into the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Initially located in temporary space in the Washington, D.C., area, planners envisioned that permanent space would be found nearby. Construction delays resulted in the selection of the former Glynco Naval Air Station as a permanent location in May 1975. Training began there in September 1975 and the facility has been in constant use ever since. Glynco is located near Brunswick, Georgia, between Savannah, Georgia, and Jacksonville, Florida.