Tag Archives: FI

Fingerprint

Fingerprint

Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems

In line with Alisa Camacho

about Fingerprint in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Automated fingerprint identification systems were developed in the mid-1990s as a computer-based alternative to ink fingerprinting. These automated systems have allowed law enforcement agencies to accurately take and match fingerprints within seconds that previously would have taken years to match manually. Using the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS), law enforcement personnel no longer must roll the fingers of those being printed in ink and then press each finger onto a paper card. Rather, automated systems use a computer to take fingerprints and handprints when the individual's hand is placed on the machine just as one would place a sheet of paper on a copy machine. The IAFIS computer scans the images and reproduces them on paper, in many cases dispensing altogether with the need for fingerprint cards. These images, unlike those on a copy machine, are not immediately forgotten.

Fingerprints

Fingerprints

Fingerprints

In line with Simon A. Cole

about Fingerprints in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Fingerprints are representations of the papillary, or “friction,” ridges on the tips of the fingers. Fingerprint identification is the world's most widely used and widely known method of criminal identification. In law enforcement, it has two primary functions: archival (using the impressions of the complete set of fingerprints, or “ten-prints,” to link an individual to his or her criminal record, even if that individual uses an alias, over the course of a lifetime) and forensic (using one or more impressions left at a crime scene to determine that an individual was present at the crime scene). There are also ancillary functions, such as the identification of an unknown corpse.

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

In line with Marvie Brooks

about Financial Crimes Enforcement Network in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Financial crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) Enforcement Network (FinCEN), a Treasury Department bureau, was established in 1990, to enforce anti-money laundering laws and to help combat money laundering in the United States of America and elsewhere. FinCEN collects, analyzes, and exchanges information, provides intelligence reports and technological services, and implements the Bank Secrecy Act and other Treasury Department mandates. FinCEN provides information and analytical reports to national and international law enforcement agencies, to financial institutions, and to domestic policy makers. FinCEN employs specialists from areas such as intelligence, financial analysis, and information technology. A major responsibility of FinCEN is oversight of the Bank Secrecy Act, a key tool in the monitoring of money laundering activities.