Tag Archives: GA

Gangs

Gangs

Gangs Investigation

In line with David Brotherton

about Gangs in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Aggressive police anti-gang activity in the late 20th century can be dated to the mid-1970s, when the law enforcement campaign against gangs called Total Resources Against Street Hoodlums (TRASH) was initiated in East Los Angeles. This movement toward a robustly proactive approach to street gang crime represented a shift from the social controls traditionally used for dealing with juvenile violence, particularly in urban areas, since the turn of the century. Such a shift in tactics mirrored a hardening in attitudes across local, state, and federal governments toward gang populations in the post-1960s period as gang violence and crime increased dramatically across the country. As a progressive, reformist phase of United States history waned, an era of neoconservativism was fully instituted with the first Reagan administration at the beginning of the 1980s.

Gays

Gays

Gays in Policing

In line with Nickie Phillips

about Gays in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Like a number of occupations, policing provides a challenging employment context for the gay population. Some gay officers have experienced not only disapproval and/or discrimination from fellow police officers, but also find that the gay community is hostile toward them as well. This is due, in part, to law enforcement's history of bias toward homosexuals. For example, a number of questions from psychological tests used in the past as part of a police recruit's application process were specifically used to weed out gay men from the field. As a result, gay officers may be closeted at work, and some have even hidden their occupation from peers in the gay community. The relationship between gay men and women and the policing community has been a tenuous one, with well-documented incidents when police themselves have harassed gays and ignored their victimization.