Tag Archives: LA

Law Enforcement Training

Law Enforcement Training

Law Enforcement Training: A Comparative Perspective

In line with Maria (Maki) Haberfeld

about Law Enforcement Training in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In many progressive countries, including the United States of America, training is an ongoing and constantly evolving venture; therefore, information about training curricula is constantly becoming obsolete. Nevertheless, the approaches some countries have taken to common training obstacles are worthy of consideration in comparative perspective. Three countries, the Netherlands, Finland, and Canada, have model approaches to professional police training. The Netherlands has adopted a useful model for addressing the need for specialization and general skills. Finland's dedication to comprehensive education has contributed to a highly professional and respected force. The Canadian approach, developed in an environment dedicated to community policing, is exemplary in the length of its programs, the variety of approaches offered, and its commitment to in-service training. In recent years the Dutch police service has undergone radical changes in its organization and training. Prior to joining the police service, all recruits follow one of three basic courses of training.

Law Enforcement Training in the United States

In line with Maria (Maki) Haberfeld

about Law Enforcement Training in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Police training in the United States of America can be divided into four distinct categories: basic academy training (the basic police academy training), the field training officer (FTO) program, specialized and developmental training, and supervisory and management training. The term police academy usually refers to three main types of police academies in the United States of America: agency, regional, and college-sponsored. Agency schools are generally found in large municipal areas or are established for the state police or highway patrol. Regional academies handle the training functions for both large and small departments located in a designated geographical area. The college-sponsored training academies operate on the premises of postsecondary institutions, particularly community colleges. These college-sponsored academies allow a person to take police training and earn college credit. Modern police training has come a long way since the times when the training was so inadequate, or even nonexistent, that officers were ignorant of their own duties.

Law Enforcement Agencies

Law Enforcement Agencies

Special Jurisdiction Law Enforcement Agencies

In line with Peter Horne

about Law Enforcement Agencies in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Police protection is the function of enforcing the law, preserving order, and apprehending those who violate the law, whether these activities are performed by a city police department, a county sher-iff's department, or a state police or federal law enforcement agency. In the United States of America, both federalism and tradition have resulted in a fragmented police structure at three levels of government: federal, state, and local. This fragmentation is compounded by the separation of local government into two levels: municipal and county. Discounting federal law enforcement agencies, the most recent, comprehensive census of state and local law enforcement agencies identified 17,784 full-time police agencies as of June 2000. The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), which conducted this study, identified those agencies employing at least one full-time sworn officer with general police arrest powers.

Law Enforcement Rangers

Law Enforcement Rangers

Law Enforcement Rangers, National Park Service

In line with Katherine B. Killoran

about Law Enforcement Rangers in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Organic Act (1916) established as the mission of the National Park Service (NPS) the preservation of the natural and cultural resources of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. The National Park Service, a bureau of the Department of the Interior (DOI), in 2004 consisted of 387 individual parks, monuments, historical sites, battlefields, recreation areas, and so forth on more than 84 million acres. The size of the national park system has doubled since 1970. The NPS has more than 20,000 employees and provides service to approximately 280 million visitors each year. The mission of the law enforcement personnel in the service is to protect park resources-natural and cultural; to protect visitors, employees, and personal and government property; and to provide a safe environment in which to enjoy national parklands.

Law Enforcement Assistance Administration

Law Enforcement Assistance Administration

Law Enforcement Assistance Administration

In line with Lou Mayo

about Law Enforcement Assistance Administration in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Prior to the 1960s, the federal government had no significant involvement in local crime problems. There was technical support from the FBI crime laboratory and central criminal/fingerprint files, along with some technical training of local police and some technical assistance from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms regarding guns and explosives. President Johnson was elected, and in a special message to Congress on “Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice” in May 1965, he declared his “war on crime,” noting that local crime was now a national concern. He proposed legislation, the Law Enforcement Assistance Act of 1965, which created a small program of federal grants to local governments, funded at $7 million per year and with a small staff of approximately 25. Subsequently, in 1968, the federal government launched a large funding program of grants to state and local governments out of concern for increasing crime rates.

Law Enforcement Assistance Administration

In line with Helen Taylor-Greene

about Law Enforcement Assistance Administration in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Law Enforcement Assistance Administration was created in response to concern about crime in the United States of America. The President's Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice established in 1965 by President Lyndon B. Johnson recommended that a federal agency be established within the Department of Justice to assist states in controlling crime. That same year the Office of Law Enforcement Assistance was created; it provided federal funds to states and localities directed toward improving criminal justice agencies, especially the police. Three years later, on June 19, 1968, the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act was signed into law.

Law Enforcement Memorials

Law Enforcement Memorials

Law Enforcement Memorials

In line with Ronald C. Van Raalte

about Law Enforcement Memorials in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

On April 28, 1854, Phil Audax wrote to the Ohio State Journal regarding the death of Cyrus Beebe, the first Columbus (Ohio) officer killed in the line of duty: Mr. Editor: Mr. Beebe, the murdered policeman … fell nobly doing his duty…. Is there not therefore an obligation now resting upon his fellow citizens? Such firmness and courage as he displayed, if exhibited on a wider field, warring for his country, would have given his name a place in history…. I would suggest therefore that the City Council take measures at once to erect over the remains of the brave executor of the law a suitable monument to commemorate his fidelity and public worth. Although the Columbus Police Department has him listed on their official memorial at headquarters, a monument to Officer Beebe has not been found. Mr.

Law Enforcement Structure

Law Enforcement Structure

Law Enforcement Structure: Centralized/Decentralized

In line with Michael Sadykiewicz

about Law Enforcement Structure in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

There are two main aspects of police force structure to consider when thinking of police centralization or decentralization: 1. Level of subordination, which refers to aspects of the police hierarchy 2. Range of fragmentation of the forces, which refers to the number of agencies performing law enforcement tasks In a police service or force, the superior is the person or institution to which the chief of a given police unit is directly subordinate in operational, personnel (appointments and promotion), and budgetary matters. Other kinds of subordination matters are of secondary importance. A centralized organizational structure system means that the sublocal police units (police stations) are subordinate to the local units; these local units in turn report to the subregional (county) headquarters, and the subregional units report to the regional (state) headquarters.

Law Enforcement

Law Enforcement

Appropriations and Budgeting for Law Enforcement

In line with Timothy K. Birch

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States government contains a vast number of law enforcement agencies within the executive, legislative, and judiciary branches. Although most people are familiar with the larger agencies, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and some of the newer agencies that have developed through the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), many people are unaware of the many different forms of law enforcement within this one level of government. The layered nature of American (United States) government, combined with the large number of federal law enforcement agencies, makes it virtually impossible to determine with any degree of accuracy the total value of funds spent by the federal government on its various law enforcement services. It is possible, though, to describe the costs associated with a number of the larger, more prominent agencies and those for whom law enforcement is a major cost center.

News Media and Police

In line with Natasha A. Frost

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Only a very small portion of the public has any direct contact with the criminal justice system. Although citizens have more opportunities to interact with the police than they do with other public servants or government employees, they still get most of their information regarding police activity from the media. From the perspective of both the police and the media, police-media relations, although often contentious, are vitally important. The news media are always looking for stories that will capture audience attention and inform residents of events that occur in their locality. Reports of crime often fit that bill. Because the police make good official sources, local crime reporters often develop working relationships with local law enforcement and turn to the police for information on a daily basis. Police departments, for their part, recognize the power of the media and, where possible, use it to their advantage.

Law Enforcement Pursuits

In line with Geoffrey P. Alpert

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

After observing a traffic violation or being alerted to a person or vehicle, a police officer can signal a driver to stop. In a vast majority of the cases, the driver will pull over and the situation will end without further concern. However, on rare occasions, the driver will refuse to stop or will take evasive action and flee. In these situations, a routine traffic stop turns into a dangerous pursuit. When that occurs, the police officer must decide whether or not to continue a chase, recognizing that if a person refuses to stop, the agency's pursuit policy attaches, and the officer must therefore take into account both policy and training before reaching a decision. Accordingly, the officer must balance both the risks and the potential benefits when deciding whether or not a pursuit is necessary.

State and Local

In line with The development of accountability in American law enforcement is intertwined with the evolution of individual rights, personal freedoms, and internal and external drives for police professionalism. Webster's defines accountability as “subject to the obligation to report, explain, or justify actions.” Throughout much of history, outside of the United States, police have been accountable to the heads of nation-states whether the authority figure was a king (Hammarabi); a monarch (King John of England); or a dictator (Napoleon, Stalin, Hitler). Even in the United States, a progressive democracy in world terms, police have answered to local politicians, judges, and legislators, and have not always been concerned with individual rights or ethical operations. The idea that police should be accountable to the citizens they served did not appear in history until the 1980s and 1990s in the United States. In the meantime, police agencies have progressed through several iterations of accountability. 1.

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement: