Tag Archives: LI

Library of Congress

Library of Congress

Library of Congress Law Enforcement Forces (Police)

In line with Maria Kiriakova

about Library of Congress in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

There are more than 30 small federal police forces operating in the District of Columbia. The Library of Congress (LOC) Police is one such agency with only 122 sworn officers and five civilians on staff. The LOC Police operate within the Capitol Hill area along with the Government Printing Office (GPO) Police and the United States of America Capitol Police (USCP). All three police forces are part of the legislative branch of the federal government. The library was established for the use of Congress by law in 1800. Eventually its services were expanded to the attorney general of the United States of America and justices of the Court of last resort of the Country and to the general public by 1866. But the institution did not get its own special police agency until 1950. In 1987, LOC police officers were authorized to carry firearms (a nine-millimeter pistol) and make arrests. Unlike the USCP and the United States

Lindbergh Law

Lindbergh Law

Lindbergh Law

In line with Frank A. Bolz Jr.

about Lindbergh Law in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The passage of federal legislation to deal with the crime of kidnapping has been forever linked to the 1932 kidnapping of the infant son of the famous aviator, Charles A. Lindbergh. In actuality, the law was intended to quell the epidemic of kidnappings that took place from the end of the roaring twenties into the early 1930s in conjunction with criminal turf battles associated with Prohibition and the rise of organized crime. Criminals were kidnapping other criminals as well as wealthy individuals or their family members. Reinforcing the association with the Lindbergh case, the law, although officially titled the Federal Kidnapping Act (18 United StatesC. 1201), is to this day popularly referred to as the Lindbergh Law.

Lie Detection

Lie Detection

Lie Detection

In line with Norma Manatu

about Lie Detection in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Up until the 1900s, unscientific methods dominated the search for detecting liars from truth-tellers. Many methods relied on divine intervention, expressed through ordeals or torture that was rooted primarily in superstition and religious faith. In Europe and colonial America, water ordeals flourished during the witch hunts of the 1600s, when suspects were tied up and thrown into water. If the suspects sank, this meant the water had accepted the purity of truth-tellers; if they floated, it meant the water had rejected the impure liars, who were then executed. Another testing method, the boiling water ordeal, in which the right hand of the accused was plunged into a kettle of boiling water, was used worldwide, whereas fire and hot iron ordeals were commonplace in India and Egypt.

Lineups

Lineups

Lineups

In line with Steven Penrod

about Lineups in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Nearly everyone is familiar with the standard American (United States) lineup: six individuals (the suspect plus five “foils” or fillers), all of whom are shown (often standing in front of a height chart) to the witness, who views the lineup members from behind a one-way mirror; is given an opportunity to observe each member of the lineup; and is instructed to make an identification, if possible, or reject the lineup. The police officer who assembled the lineup has selected foils who resemble the suspect (often using other police officers or people who are in custody), arranged the presentation (sometimes in consultation with the suspect's defense attorney), and presented the lineup to the witness-sometimes with an admonition that the witness should take his or her time.