Tag Archives: MC

McNeil v. Wisconsin

McNeil v. Wisconsin

McNeil v. Wisconsin as a Leading U.S. Case

McNeil v. Wisconsin is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, McNeil v. Wisconsin may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about McNeil v. Wisconsin tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of McNeil v. Wisconsin is also explained, together with the relevance of McNeil v. Wisconsin impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of McNeil v. Wisconsin

501 U.S. 171 (1991)

Mccone Commission

Mccone Commission

The Mccone Commission

In line with Anders Walker

about Mccone Commission in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In the late summer of 1965, a predominantly black neighborhood of Los Angeles known as Watts descended into 6 days of massive rioting. California Governor Edmund “Pat” Brown, reeling from the political impact of the unrest, tapped John A. McCone, former director of the CIA and a well-known conservative, to conduct an impartial study of the unrest. McCone proceeded to lead a commission-the McCone Commission, which was made up of six whites and two African Americans, as well as a support staff of 29 assistants, 16 clerks and secretaries, and 26 consultants-through a series of hearings, interviews, and studies. This process was designed to provide descriptive and chronological information about the riots as well as to give recommendations to prevent their recurrence.