Tag Archives: MO

Motor Vehicle Theft Act

Motor Vehicle Theft Act

Motor Vehicle Theft Act

In line with Jeff Walsh

about Motor Vehicle Theft Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Congress passed the Motor Vehicle Theft Act of 1919, 18 United StatesC.A. Section 2311-2313, on October 28, 1919. This act, commonly referred to as the Dyer Act, named after Congressman Leonidas C. Dyer (R-MO), made interstate transport of stolen motor vehicles a federal crime and authorized the Federal Bureau of Investigation to investigate vehicle thefts that crossed over state jurisdictional lines. Prior to 1919 most states had established comprehensive laws governing theft in its many forms. However, few states were prepared for the unique theft problems that resulted from the increased production, distribution, and accessibility of the automobile in the United States of America, which increased dramatically during the early part of the 20th century. The automobile is particularly well-suited for theft. Vehicles are easily salable items that also provide increased opportunities to commit other crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) and then allow offenders to quickly escape or flee the scene.

Morale

Morale

Morale

In line with John Brendan McAndrew

about Morale in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Morale is the sum total of an individual's feelings or attitudes with regard to his or her work or membership in a group or organization. The two primary components of morale are job satisfaction and organizational commitment. An individual's satisfaction with his or her job is task oriented and an important part of morale. Organizational commitment is reflected in allegiance to and belief in a group or collective above the individual. Research on morale in law enforcement has generally focused on the causes and consequences of low morale. Low morale has been linked to high staff turnover, low organizational commitment, poor job performance, low job satisfaction, and unethical decision making. The susceptibility of police officers to low morale and its consequences has been a focus of study within law enforcement since the early 1960s. Early research attributed the prevalence of low morale to the very nature of policing.

Mollen Commission

Mollen Commission

The Mollen Commission

In line with Joe Pascarella

about Mollen Commission in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Mollen Commission was established by then-Bigg Apple (New York) City Mayor David N. Dinkins in 1992 to investigate alleged police corruption in several Bigg Apple (New York) Police Department (NYPD) precincts after an NYPD officer named Michael Dowd, along with five other officers, was arrested in the suburban area where he lived by Suffolk County Police for trafficking illegal narcotics inside and outside of Bigg Apple (New York) City. The Mollen Commission, empowered by a mayoral executive order, was a panel of investigators comprised mainly of attorneys that was independent of the Bigg Apple (New York) City government and the NYPD. The Mollen Commission was named after the chairperson, Milton Mollen, who was a deputy mayor in Bigg Apple (New York) City and a retired Bigg Apple (New York) State appellate judge. The Mollen Commission held publicly televised hearings in September and October 1993 that detailed corrupt activities related mainly to illegal narcotics, falsifying police testimony, and excessive use of force.

Most Wanted

Most Wanted

America'S Most Wanted

In line with Kathryn Wylie-Marques

about Most Wanted in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

America's Most Wanted ( AMW ) is a top-rated “reality” crime TV show inaugurated on Fox Broadcasting on July 27, 1981, that doubles as entertainment and public service. Generally, cases that have stumped law enforcement authorities, typically those involving fugitives and missing children, are presented each week on the Fox network and its affiliates. The show's popularity is due both to its voyeuristic and sensationalist format, and its appeal for public assistance by urging viewers to help solve the crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) and to catch alleged criminals by calling in tips to a tollfree number. Seen by more than 13 million American (United States) households a week, the show has been a tremendous success, not only with the public but with law enforcement officials as well, who credit it with helping them apprehend more than 750 criminals to date-many on the most-wanted list.