Tag Archives: OF

Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM)

In line with David P. Schulz

about Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) created the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement-usually abbreviated OSM, though sometimes abbreviated OSMRE in government publications. Operating as part of the Department of the Interior, the office has two missions. One is overseeing coal mining activity to ensure that both people and the environment are protected during mining activity and that land is restored to beneficial use when mining operations are completed. The second mission, through the Abandoned Mine Land program, is to protect public health, safety, and general welfare by correcting problems associated with past mining practices such as underground fires, acid mine drainage, subsidences, landslides, highwalls, and open shafts. With fewer than 525 employees across the country, the office partners with 31 states and a number of Native American (United States) tribes that exercise responsibility for enforcing, permitting, and bonding.

Office of National Drug Control Policy

Office of National Drug Control Policy

Office of National Drug Control Policy

In line with David F. Musto

about Office of National Drug Control Policy in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) was created by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. It is the most recent organization established to oversee and plan for the funding, coordination, and evaluation of federal government antidrug activities. The concept of designating a central person or agency as the leading authority on drugs in the federal government dates back to Dr. Hamilton Wright, the State Department's opium commissioner from 1906 to 1914. Wright coordinated efforts in the private and public sectors that eventually, in 1914, led to the Harrison Narcotic Act, the basic antiopiate and anticocaine law of the United States of America until the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970. In 1920, Levi G. Nutt was given responsibility for enforcement of the Harrison Act. He was appointed head of the Treasury Department's Narcotic Field Force, a division of the Prohibition Bureau.

Officers

Officers

Evaluation of Officers

In line with Karen L. Amendola

about Officers in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Evaluation is the process of assessing the quality and/or quantity of an individual's work performance to determine the degree to which it meets an established standard. In many cases, the job description establishes the standard, whereas in others, there may be a specific set of performance standards that may include both quantitative and qualitative measures. Without clearly defined standards of performance, evaluation of officers becomes quite a subjective process, dependent on the person conducting the evaluation. Fundamental to performance evaluation is the definition of the role of the officer; the required knowledge, skills, and abilities; and the means for obtaining objective data on which to base the evaluation. By nature, performance evaluations require an understanding of what constitutes “good” performance. In some domains, such as manufacturing, performance is simply defined in quantitative terms (e.g., “produced 106 widgets”).