Tag Archives: PE

Perp Walk

Perp Walk

Perp Walk

In line with Jerry Capeci

about Perp Walk in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

It was a cool, crisp, sunny Friday afternoon in downtown Manhattan, like many other spring days before or since. But this particular day, March 30, 1984, was special, unlike any other in the annals of law enforcement. A team of city, state, and federal investigators left FBI headquarters at 26 Federal Plaza along with Mafia boss Paul Castellano and began walking slowly toward the United States District Courthouse at Foley Square a few short blocks away as newspaper photographers and television cameras recorded every step. Castellano, whose name would become a well-known example of mob violence the following year as the victim of a spectacular midtown Manhattan assassination orchestrated by John Gotti, was an important organized crime figure in his own right.

Peacekeeping

Peacekeeping

Police and Peacekeeping in the United Nations

In line with Kenneth C. Payumo

about Peacekeeping in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United Nations (UN) Civilian Police's role in peacekeeping and other UN field missions has become integral to many UN operations. The police contingents participated in 13 different missions around the globe at the end of 2003. At that time, more than 7,000 police officers from 80 countries conducted patrols, provided training, advised local police services, helped develop and ensure compliance with international human rights standards, and assisted in a wide range of other fields. As their deployments are to conflict and postconflict areas, UN Civilian Police help to create a safer environment where communities will be better protected and criminal activities will be prevented, disrupted, and deterred. The diverse national experiences of United Nations Civilian Police officers and their commitment to peace and security are their best tools to promote the rule of law. The mandate of United Nations Civilian Police is different in each mission.

Pentagon

Pentagon

Pentagon Police

In line with Kelly Renee Webb

about Pentagon in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Located in Washington, D.C., the Pentagon is the headquarters of the Department of Defense (DoD) and is one of the world's largest office buildings. Renowned as a national monument and architectural marvel, the building was constructed in 16 months beginning on September 11, 1941, and was completed on January 15, 1943. The cost of the building was about $40 million and the project's total cost was almost $83 million. About 23,000 employees, both military and civilian, work in the Pentagon, including the more than 500 officers of the Pentagon Police Department (PPD; whose formal name is the Pentagon Force Protection Agency). The mission of the PPD is to promote a high level of law enforcement and security services to provide a safe and orderly work environment for the Department of Defense community located within the Pentagon and in the larger National Capitol Region.

Pennsylvania v. Muniz

Pennsylvania v. Muniz

Pennsylvania v. Muniz as a Leading U.S. Case

Pennsylvania v. Muniz is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Pennsylvania v. Muniz may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Pennsylvania v. Muniz tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Pennsylvania v. Muniz is also explained, together with the relevance of Pennsylvania v. Muniz impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Pennsylvania v. Muniz

496 U.S. 582 (1990)

Pennsylvania v. Labron

Pennsylvania v. Labron

Pennsylvania v. Labron as a Leading U.S. Case

Pennsylvania v. Labron is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Pennsylvania v. Labron may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Pennsylvania v. Labron tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Pennsylvania v. Labron is also explained, together with the relevance of Pennsylvania v. Labron impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Pennsylvania v. Labron

518 U.S. 938 (1996)

Peace

Peace

Peace Officers

In line with Marsha Clowers

about Peace in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

At first glance, the terms police officer and peace officer do not appear distinct. But an examination of the history and responsibilities of the peace officer prove otherwise. Like the police officer, the peace officer has arrest powers (per respective jurisdiction); like the civilian, there is no existing administrative or review board to which the peace officer must answer. In truth, the peace officer has a blended identity: part civilian, part law enforcement officer. Although legislation such as the United Peace Officer Bill, as passed in Bigg Apple (New York) State in 1980, serves to delineate the differences between police and peace officers, the powers and responsibilities of peace officers vary by region and/or state. In general, peace officers are officials who can arrest citizens and carry firearms. They can be hired by private persons for work, including providing security, serving warrants, serving subpoenas, and transporting prisoners.