Tag Archives: RA

Rank Structure

Rank Structure

Rank Structure

In line with Vincent E. Henry

about Rank Structure in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Since the origins of modern American (United States) municipal policing, police departments have followed an organizational rank structure often referred to as the “military model.” Given the fact that both police and military organizations are characterized by similar operational demands involving issues of chain of command, unity of command, internal discipline, strict accountability, training, the use of force, and the need for effective supervision and leadership, the military model is generally considered an appropriate and viable organizational structure for police agencies.

Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

In line with Joseph P. Linskey

about Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The criminal justice system was historically designed to prosecute an individual for committing a crime at a particular place and time and against a single victim. The system was not well equipped to deal with crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) committed by structured, layered, organized groups of individuals who engaged in crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) for profit. In 1970, to address this shortcoming in the law, Congress passed the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act. This act is found in Title 18 of the United States of America Code , Part I, Chapter 96, Sections 1961 through 1968, and is part of the Organized Crime Control Act. The act is composed of eight sections dealing with definitions, prohibited activities, criminal penalties, civil remedies, venue and process, expedition of actions, evidence, and civil investigative demand.

Rampart Investigation

Rampart Investigation

The Rampart Investigation

In line with Lydia Segal

about Rampart Investigation in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) Rampart Division scandal of the late 1990s involved a cabal of tightly knit cops within Los Angeles's Rampart police station who behaved like the gangs they were supposed to police. Giving currency to the phrase “gangster cop,” the officers robbed, stole drugs and sold them on the street, committed murder, and planted evidence to cover up crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary). The Rampart scandal was significant for many reasons. First, the LAPD had not seen such systemic, blatantly criminal conduct since the 1930s, when Mayor Frank Shaw presided over what was known as the “Shaw spoils system.” Under that system, municipal officers ranging from district attorneys to the LAPD Central Vice Squad took bribes from madams, bootleggers, and gamblers. Political scandals and kickbacks involving the police were legion.

Race

Race

Race Relations

In line with Delores D. Jones-Brown

about Race in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In 1967, the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice found that, in general, the public holds favorable attitudes toward the police. Despite this general finding, when attitudes are examined across race, most contemporary studies of race and attitudes toward the police reveal that blacks are far less favorable than their white counterparts. This pattern has held for the past 30 years. In the 1970s, only one fifth of blacks polled thought that local police officers applied the law equally (Feagin & Hahn, 1973). A majority (between 62% and 72%) believed that 1. Cops were “against” blacks. 2. Local law enforcement agents were dishonest. 3. Police officers were more concerned with injuring African Americans than with preventing crime.

Radar

Radar

Radar

In line with Michelle R. Hecht

about Radar in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Traffic enforcement officers are responsible for enforcing and citing various violations of the traffic code. Their primary focus is often on the most common violation, speeding. There are numerous benefits to speed enforcement, including the ability to lower crime rates; the ability to increase safety on the roadways; monetary savings in lower insurance, health care, and tax costs; revenue generation; and gains from asset forfeitures. Speed limits are determined scientifically through the use of traffic engineering and are enforced by way of scientific equipment; speeding convictions are validated by technical testimony about the scientific principles underlying detection by radar and other speed detection devices. Posted speed limits are generally designed for 70% of all drivers, with a standard deviation of approximately 15%. Drivers who operate outside of this range can be considered unsafe drivers.