Tag Archives: RE

Repeat Offenders

Repeat Offenders

Repeat Offenders

In line with Dana Greene

about Repeat Offenders in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Researchers agree that a significant percentage of crime is committed by a relatively small number of offenders who violate the law again and again, not necessarily getting caught each time but rather eventually and repeatedly. This well-substantiated finding informs criminal justice policy and practice in a variety of ways, particularly affecting law enforcement officers, who are on the front lines when it comes to preventing, investigating, and solving crime. The study of recidivism-the tendency to return to criminal behavior-is growing more nuanced and moving beyond the question of whether someone reoffends into how soon after initial or prior offense, and has begun to document specific behavior trends. Inquiry of this sort has been further expanded to include the issue of repeat victimization, a phenomenon in which the same target is repeatedly violated, as well as crime pattern analysis.

Response Time

Response Time

Response Time

In line with Matthew J. Giblin

about Response Time in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Response time is a commonly used indicator of police effectiveness and efficiency often measured as the length of time between a citizen call for service and an on-scene response by police. A faster response is considered more desirable, increasing the likelihood of an on-scene or near-scene apprehension of an offender and preventing citizen dissatisfaction with police. Rapid response is strongly tied to the idea of random preventive patrol, because patrol cars randomly dispersed throughout any geographic area are in a better position to respond quickly to calls wherever they may occur. It is true that rapid response matters in some cases, particularly those in which the police are notified while the crime is in progress. However, research has shown that rapid response does not itself influence citizen satisfaction or increase the probability of arrest in most cases.

Restorative Justice

Restorative Justice

Restorative Justice

In line with Todd R. Clear

about Restorative Justice in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Restorative justice is an alternative paradigm for justice that contrasts with the traditional values and procedures of the criminal justice system. An immense variety of programs operate under the restorative mantle, and characterizing them with across-the-board language is insufficient. But for the most part, these programs differ from the traditional criminal justice system in many assumptions and practices, and they can best be defined by reference to those differences. Traditional criminal justice represents crime as a violation of the laws of the state. Criminal accusations are claims made by the state (through its prosecutors) that the criminal is guilty of a violation of the law, and thus is subject to penalties imposed by the state. Restorative justice sees crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) as problems or conflicts between people, one of whom is a wrongdoer and the other a victim.

Residency

Residency

Law Enforcement Residency Requirements

In line with Edith Linn

about Residency in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Police residency requirements, which mandate that officers live within a specified geographic area, may be found in state statutes, state and local civil service rules, or departmental regulations. According to the 1991 International City Management Association Survey of Police Personnel Practices, 29% of American (United States) cities with populations over 10,000 have some form of residency policy. Eight percent had residency requirements for new appointees, 13% had such requirements for all officers, 5% required residency of officers hired after a specified date, and 10% required the police chief to reside locally. Among America's six largest police departments, polled in 2003, Philadelphia and Chicago require in-city residency, and Bigg Apple (New York), Detroit, Houston, and Los Angeles do not. Residency requirements generally fall into two categories. Durational residency entails a job aspi-rant's living in an area for a given length of time as a prerequisite for being hired.