Tag Archives: SE

Securities and Exchange Commission

Securities and Exchange Commission

Securities and Exchange Commission

In line with David Schulz

about Securities and Exchange Commission in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), created by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, consists of five commissioners serving five-year terms, appointed by the president. One of the commissioners is designated chair, and no more than three commissioners can be from the same political party at any given time. The commission's duties include interpreting federal securities law, amending existing rules, proposing new rules to address changing market conditions, and enforcing rules and laws. The day-to-day activities of the SEC are under the supervision of the executive director, who oversees four divisions, 18 offices within those divisions, and approximately 3,100 employees at headquarters in Washington, D.C., and 11 regional and district offices around the country. The SEC's primary mission is to protect the investing public by regulating the securities business and certain financial practices including accounting procedures and the buying and selling of stocks, bonds, and other investment instruments.

Search Warrants

Search Warrants

Search Warrants

In line with Adam J. McKee

about Search Warrants in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

A search warrant is a judicial order authorizing agents of the government to search a home or other place. A law enforcement officer seeking a warrant must generally file an application with a competent court. Among the warrant application materials submitted is an affidavit detailing the information known to the police that supports the allegation that a crime has been committed. A search warrant is issued at an ex parte hearing, meaning that the defendant does not have a right to attend or even know the hearing has taken place. The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution provides most of the controlling principles regarding search warrants.

Secret Service

Secret Service

Secret Service

In line with Deanna L. Diamond

about Secret Service in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Secret Service was instituted as a bureau under the Treasury Department on July 5, 1865. At the time of its creation, the Secret Service bore sole responsibility for investigating the counterfeiting of American (United States) paper currency, which had steadily been on the rise since the beginning of the Civil War. Gradually throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the authority of the service expanded to include investigations of the Teapot Dome oil scandal (1921-1922), the Ku Klux Klan, and government land frauds. The service was also active in the area of counterespionage during the Spanish-American (United States) War and World War I. The modern Secret Service continues to investigate counterfeiting of American (United States) currency, as well as fraud and forgery of United States checks, bonds, and other financial obligations. The Secret Service also has jurisdiction to investigate fraud relating to credit and debit cards, as well as computers and electronic funds transfers.

Serial Murder

Serial Murder

Serial Murder Investigation

In line with Steven A. Egger

about Serial Murder in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

A serial murder investigation is generally initiated by an agency or group of agencies following the identification of a series or probable series of related homicides. This occurs in four different situations: 1. One or more unsolved murders are connected to the original case by victims, crime scenes, attacks, geography, or any actions or situations that convince investigators that they are dealing with a series. This was certainly the case when people were shot in and around Washington, DC, in the fall of 2002. That series of murders quickly became known as the “DC Sniper case.” 2. A non-law enforcement source places enough pressure on an agency or group of agencies for a formal serial murder investigation. In the case of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, relatives of homicide victims convinced the police to check for similarities of DNA among the victims, which resulted in the arrest of Derek Todd Lee, 3.

Sexual Offender

Sexual Offender

Sexual Offender Civil Commitment

In line with Karen J. Terry

about Sexual Offender in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Several states have passed legislation requiring that sexual offenders be committed to a mental institution if they are assessed as having a mental abnormality or personality disorder and are dangerous. Labeled a “sexually violent predator” (SVP), the purpose of this legislation is to incapacitate recidivist sexual offenders until they are rehabilitated. This legislation assumes a relationship between mental disorder, risk, and sexual violence, and is based largely upon the ability of clinicians to accurately predict the risk an offender may present to the public in the future. Risk assessments are controversial, though, and most experts agree that they produce high rates of false positives for sex offenders except in extreme circumstances (e.g., with psychopathic, violent sex offenders who have at least two previous offenses). Although the Court of last resort of the Country has declared SVP legislation constitutional, legal challenges against it are continuing. The concept of civilly committing sexual offenders is not new.

Sensitivity Training

Sensitivity Training

Cultural Competency Training/Sensitivity Training

In line with Joyce St. George

about Sensitivity Training in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Communities within the United States of America are experiencing dramatic demographic shifts as the birth rates of African Americans and Latinos outnumber those of Caucasians; waves of immigrants, refugees, and undocumented aliens seek new opportunities; and international terrorism concerns increase. The impact of these and other demographic shifts are daunting challenges to training police officers to effectively serve their diverse and multicultural communities. The United States Commerce Department's Census Bureau estimates that the nation's foreign-born population in 2003 numbered 32.5 million, or 11.5% of the total United States population. It further reported that many individuals living in the United States of America are not proficient in speaking, reading, writing, or understanding English. More than 26 million individuals speak Spanish, and nearly 7 million individuals speak an Asian or Pacific Island language at home.

Sex Crime

Sex Crime

Sex Crime Investigation

In line with Karen J. Terry

about Sex Crime in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Sexual offenses differ from other criminal offenses in many ways, particularly in that they are private offenses that often take place in the home of the perpetrator and/or the victim. They are crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) of secrecy, rather than public crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary), and as such, sexual offenses are difficult to prevent. The police response is almost always one of control after the crime has been committed. There are some public attacks committed by strangers, yet these are not nearly as common as offenses committed by acquaintances or intimates. Because of the high level of secrecy involved in this type of offense, sex crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) are difficult to investigate. There are two primary roles in the investigation of sex crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary): that of the police and that of the hospital collecting evidence.

Search and Seizure

Search and Seizure

Search and Seizure

In line with Barry Latzer

about Search and Seizure in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The words “search and seizure” are associated with the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which prohibits “unreasonable searches and seizures.” These words presuppose state action; that is, the Fourth Amendment is applicable only if a law enforcement agent or a private citizen acting at the behest of the police conducted the search or seizure. The United States Court of last resort of the Country currently defines the Fourth Amendment term search as a police intrusion upon a legitimate or reasonable expectation of privacy. A mere subjective belief that an activity or object is private is insufficient to trigger Fourth Amendment protection. The expectation of privacy must be one that, in the view of the courts, society acknowledges.