Tag Archives: SH

Sherman v. United States

Sherman v. United States

Sherman v. United States as a Leading U.S. Case

Sherman v. United States is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Sherman v. United States may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Sherman v. United States tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Sherman v. United States is also explained, together with the relevance of Sherman v. United States impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Sherman v. United States

356 U.S. 369 (1958)

Shootings

Shootings

Law Enforcement Shootings

In line with David A. Klinger

about Shootings in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Recent years have seen a good deal of research on the use of deadly force by police officers. Law enforcement professionals, for example, regularly examine shootings in order to develop a more complete understanding of such events to thereby reduce their frequency and increase the odds that officers will act appropriately in those events that do occur. Largely overlooked in this research effort, however, is the matter of how officers experience events in which they discharge their weapons. This entry discusses what we do know about the reactions that officers can experience during shootings and discusses some implications for a broader understanding of these incidents. Following a brief discussion of the research on officers' reactions during shootings, what we know about the reactions that officers who shoot can experience is presented in two categories: thoughts and feelings, and perceptual distortions.

Sheriffs

Sheriffs

Sheriffs

In line with Adam J. McKee

about Sheriffs in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The office of sheriff has developed into what it is today over a long period of history. The office began in medieval England when the country was divided into tribal areas known as shires, the equivalent of a modern county. In antiquity, the King's justice was administered by “shire-reeves,” who presided over the shire courts. The sheriff, then, is the modern counterpart of the shire-reeve. After William the Conqueror claimed the English crown in 1066, there was no uniform criminal law (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia here) in England. The many individual shire courts were dominated by sheriffs, who enforced the village rules as they saw fit. Formal law enforcement agencies emerged in England in the 13th century, evolving to meet the needs of the day. The first colonists in America established law enforcement institutions as the first communities were established.