Tag Archives: ST

Stoner v. California

Stoner v. California

Stoner v. California as a Leading U.S. Case

Stoner v. California is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Stoner v. California may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Stoner v. California tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Stoner v. California is also explained, together with the relevance of Stoner v. California impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Stoner v. California

376 U.S. 483 (1964)

Steagald v. United States

Steagald v. United States

Steagald v. United States as a Leading U.S. Case

Steagald v. United States is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Steagald v. United States may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Steagald v. United States tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Steagald v. United States is also explained, together with the relevance of Steagald v. United States impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Steagald v. United States

451 U.S. 204 (1981)

State Police

State Police

State Police

In line with Hugh E. O'Rourke

about State Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Traditionally, law enforcement in the United States of America has been organized on a local level. Until the beginning of the 20th century, police departments were organized on a village, town, city, or county basis. If emergency conditions called for more manpower, the militia or National Guard could be called to assist. However, in some industrial states, the frequent mobilizations and subsequent reluctance of the National Guard to deal with labor disputes at the turn of the 20th century resulted in the creation of a large police department under the control of the governor. The popularity of the automobile also created a need for a police agency that had jurisdiction within the entire state and could pursue violators anywhere in the state. The state police could also serve as an agency to patrol in rural areas that were without local police departments.

Stop and Frisk

Stop and Frisk

Stop and Frisk

In line with Adam J. McKee

about Stop and Frisk in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Fourth Amendment provides that “the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated.” The precise text of the Amendment can be misleading. In Katz v. United States of America (1967), the United States Court of last resort of the Country determined that the right protected people, not property. The practical implication of this ruling was that the Court would no longer consider whether the violation was against “houses, papers, and effects,” but rather whether an individual's reasonable expectation of privacy was violated. Thus, the Court shifted from a property analysis to a privacy analysis when considering the constitutionality of a search. The Katz Court handed down its decision during a period of rapid change in the law of police procedure under then-Chief Justice Earl Warren; legal scholars often refer to this period as the procedural revolution .

Stress

Stress

Stress

In line with Karyn Hadfield

about Stress in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Police officers encounter work-related stressors unknown to most other professionals. Street-level police work often places the officer in imminent risk of physical injury or death. Even when their own personal safety is not at risk, officers are often witness to others who have been brutalized or killed, and are suffering. Coupled with this often-unpredictable work environment, many officers also experience stress as a result of their exposure to the bureaucratic structure of the police department itself. Officers experience both acute and chronic stressors that, over time, can affect job performance, personal relationships, and long-term psychological adjustment and physical health. At their most severe, the effects of stress may manifest in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), substance abuse, divorce, or suicide. Law enforcement agencies, recognizing the impact stress can have on officers and their families, are implementing prevention and reduction strategies. Police routinely interact with the most antisocial elements of society.