Tag Archives: TE

Tennessee v. Garner

Tennessee v. Garner

Tennessee v. Garner as a Leading U.S. Case

Tennessee v. Garner is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Tennessee v. Garner may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Tennessee v. Garner tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Tennessee v. Garner is also explained, together with the relevance of Tennessee v. Garner impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Tennessee v. Garner

471 U.S. 1 (1985)

Terrorist Groups

Terrorist Groups

Domestic Terrorist Groups

In line with Steven Chermak & Jeff Gruenewald

about Terrorist Groups in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Public concern about international terrorism changed dramatically after al Qaeda successfully attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Although it was the most significant mass casualty terror attack in the history of the United States of America, it was not the first. As recently as 9 years ago, Timothy McVeigh, a right-wing extremist who has been called the American (United States) Terrorist (Michel & Herbeck, 2001), destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, killing 168 people and injuring many more. This attack, like the September 11, 2001, attacks, shocked the public and changed people's concerns about terrorism. In order to understand terrorism and the threat of terror, it is important to consider both international and domestic threats. This entry focuses on the latter. This discussion serves as an overview of domestic terrorism in America.

Foreign Terrorist Groups

In line with Adam Dulin

about Terrorist Groups in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The term terrorism is rooted in the French Revolution during Maximilien Robespierre's reign of terror, a period when potential enemies of the government were ruthlessly exterminated. Terrorism itself is much older than the origins of the term. For example, the Assassins, a group related to mainstream Shiite Muslims in Iran, committed acts of terrorism more than 1,000 years ago. Likewise, the Thugs of India terrorized travelers in ritualistic fashion for more than three centuries. There is no single accepted definition of what constitutes terrorism. More than 100 definitions have been offered by academe and law enforcement agencies through decades of research. The pejorative nature of the term, as well as the politics involved in designating an act of violence as terrorism, contribute to the difficulty in developing a single definition.

Television

Television

Police Shows in Television

In line with Pamela Donovan

about Television in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The television police show is a crucial, or even sole, source of information about policing for large numbers of citizens. Many citizens have limited contact with the police and thus develop their ideas about police work and crime from television. Police work, as represented in television drama, has consistently differed from the views in film, books, and television crime news. Film noir and detective novels from the 1930s onward depicted a morally corrupt world in which police officers operated. This is a contrast to Dragnet (1951-1959 and 1967-1970), the first series developed in the “police procedural” format. The procedural has served as a basic model for the police series up through the present.

Texas v. Brown

Texas v. Brown

Texas v. Brown as a Leading U.S. Case

Texas v. Brown is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Texas v. Brown may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Texas v. Brown tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Texas v. Brown is also explained, together with the relevance of Texas v. Brown impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Texas v. Brown

460 U.S. 730 (1983)

Terrorism

Terrorism

Police and Terrorism

In line with Heath B. Grant

about Terrorism in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Terrorism is not a new phenomenon to the world; however, following the tragic events of September 11, 2001, many people both domestically and internationally struggled with the search for answers to how this was able to happen. In its wake, law enforcement has been forced to reexamine its role in society as new questions surface related to the balance between public safety and security, the extent of collaboration with federal jurisdictions, the ability to mobilize community support for information-gathering and intelligence activities, and how to develop sufficient resources for both the detection of incidents and response to those that occur. Although the magnitude of the September 11 attacks created a sense of urgency and priority, the need for strategies and tactics to thwart terrorist attacks is not new to law enforcement officials.

Terry v. Ohio

Terry v. Ohio

Terry v. Ohio as a Leading U.S. Case

Terry v. Ohio is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Terry v. Ohio may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Terry v. Ohio tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Terry v. Ohio is also explained, together with the relevance of Terry v. Ohio impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Terry v. Ohio

392 U.S. 1 (1968)

Tennessee Valley Authority Police

Tennessee Valley Authority Police

Tennessee Valley Authority Police

In line with Aviva Twersky-Glasner

about Tennessee Valley Authority Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Tennessee Valley Authority Police (TVAP) is a federally commissioned, internationally accredited law enforcement agency that provides protection for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) properties and employees as well as the 100 million annual users of TVA recreation facilities. The TVA is the largest public power company in the United States of America, with 30,365 megawatts of dependable generating capacity. TVA's power facilities include 11 fossil plants, 29 hydroelectric dams, three nuclear plants, a pumped-storage facility, and 17,000 miles of transmission lines. Through 158 locally owned distributors, TVA provides power to nearly 8.3 million residents in the Tennessee Valley. TVA also manages the Tennessee River, the nation's fifth-largest river, to control floods, make rivers easier to travel, provide recreation, and keep the water clean. Since 1933, the Tennessee Valley Authority has employed public safety officers who have law enforcement responsibilities.