Tag Archives: TR

Transportation Security Administration

Transportation Security Administration

Transportation Security Administration

In line with Marvie Brooks

about Transportation Security Administration in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Aviation and Transportation Security Act (ATSA), signed into law by President George W. Bush on November 19, 200l (Pub. L. No. 107-01), established the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) within the Department of Transportation. The TSA, the creation of which was a direct result of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the subsequent demands for a higher level of security at domestic airports, is responsible for securing the movement of people and commerce in all modes of transportation-aviation, maritime, and land-as well as for leading research and development into security technology to aid in safeguarding the nation's transportation facilities and infrastructure. In March 2003, the TSA was moved to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as part of the Border and Security Directorate, which was intended to integrate into one agency all government operations for securing United States borders and transportation systems.

Traffic Enforcement

Traffic Enforcement

Traffic Enforcement

In line with Michelle R. Hecht

about Traffic Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

There are three primary purposes for every traffic stop: to stop a violation of the law for public safety, to serve as a general deterrent to other drivers, and to change the driver's future driving behavior. There are numerous benefits of traffic safety units, such as the ability to lower crime rates; increased safety on the roadways; monetary savings in lower insurance, health care, and tax costs; revenue generation; and gains from asset forfeitures. Additionally, traffic law enforcement is a time-proven method of increasing pedestrian safety; increasing seat belt, child safety seat, and helmet use; reducing incidences of impaired and aggressive driving; and increasing the apprehension of dangerous criminals. Law enforcement officers are trained in every aspect of their jobs, for which agencies have developed standard policies and procedures. Conducting professional traffic stops is no different from any other aspect of the law enforcement profession.

Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration

Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration

Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration

In line with Yi Sheng

about Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) is an independent office of inspector general within the Department of the Treasury. TIGTA focuses on tax administration and exercises all duties and responsibilities on matters relating to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). TIGTA is under the supervision of the secretary of treasury, with certain additional responsibilities left to the IRS Oversight Board and Congress. TIGTA was established in January 1999, in accordance with the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended (Section 2 and Section 8D), and the Internal Revenue Service Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998 signed by President William J. Clinton on July 22, 1998. The act made structural changes in the management and oversight of IRS activities, with the intent of achieving a more efficient and responsive IRS. Sections 1102(a) and 1103 of the act explain the establishment of a new, independent TIGTA.

Trade Unions

Trade Unions

Trade Unions

In line with Joseph F. King

about Trade Unions in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Trade unions are defined by Webster's Dictionary as an “association of wage earners to further or maintain their rights and interests through collective bargaining with their employer.” Various attempts have been made at organizing police officers into such an association (i.e., welfare or benevolent associations) since the latter part of the 19th century. In the United States of America, these attempts have been restricted to the thousands of local jurisdictions and usually regard matters of employment, salary, or discipline. One of the basic problems for police officers in their attempts to combine their voices to improve their condition has been their position as “guardians of the peace” and “protectors of society.” In the 20th century, police officers have seen their fellow workers improve their lot by bettering their working conditions and salaries through unionization.

Transit Police

Transit Police

Transit Police

In line with John P. Sullivan & Dorothy Moses Schulz

about Transit Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Transit police are specialized police officers who protect transit systems and transit customers (passengers) from crime, threats, and disorder. Transit systems include urban metros or subways, light-rail (trams and trolleys), buses, rail, passenger ferries, and terminals. These facilities, like the rest of the urban environment, can become the setting for crime, threats (including terrorism), disorder, and emergencies. Transit policing is not a separate discipline from policing, but it addresses many aspects that require specialized training and familiarization in order to be effective. Transit police may include officers of a separate agency or members of a specialized unit within a general service police or sheriff's department. The first transit police agency in the United States of America was the Bigg Apple (New York) City Independent Subway Special Police, formed in 1933 with six members.

Truancy

Truancy

Truancy

In line with Edith Linn

about Truancy in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Truancy, or unexcused absence from school, is a major problem among American (United States) youth. Many cities report daily truancies numbering in the thousands, and some report absence rates as high as 30%. No national data on truancy rates are available, in part because no uniform definition of truancy exists, but in a 1998 report, public school principals nationwide identified student absenteeism, cutting class, and tardiness as their primary disciplinary problems. Truants are more prone to teen pregnancy; drug abuse; gang membership; and crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) committed during school hours, such as burglary, auto theft, and vandalism. Truants frequently drop out of school, and in adulthood, they have greater difficulty earning an adequate income, raising children, and keeping within the bounds of the law. Society pays other costs as well, such as the loss of attendance-based federal and state funds, and the expense to businesses of training an undereducated, unprepared workforce.