Tag Archives: US

USA Patriot Act

USA Patriot Act

USA Patriot Act

In line with Mary Gibbons

about USA Patriot Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The USA PATRIOT Act (USAPA) is the shorthand term for Public Law 107-56, federal legislation that is also known by its complete name, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act. This legislation was signed into law by President George W. Bush on October 26, 2001, less than two months after the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) proposed an initial version days after September 11, 2001. The 342-page bill was meant, according to the legislation, to provide the president and DOJ with the “tools and resources necessary to disrupt, weaken, thwart, and eliminate the infrastructure of terrorist organizations, to prevent or thwart terrorist attacks, and to punish perpetrators of terrorist acts.” The original proposal, crafted by DOJ with representatives of a number of federal agencies, sought to expand the investigative and surveillance techniques available to law enforcement.

U.S. Police Canine Association, Inc.

U.S. Police Canine Association, Inc.

U.S. Police Canine Association, Inc.

In line with Nicole R. Green

about U.S. Police Canine Association, Inc. in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Police Canine Association (USPCA) was founded in 1971 in Washington, D.C., when two existing organizations with similar values, the Police K-9 Association and the United States of America K-9 Association, united. The Police K-9 Association was originally known as the Florida Police K-9 Association but was renamed in 1968 in order to include other southeastern states. The United States of America K-9 Association, which was founded a few years after the Police K-9 Association's name-change, drew its membership from residents of the northeastern states. A short time after the inauguration of the United States of America K-9 Association, both organizations realized that strength would be gained by uniting. The USPCA established its National Executive Committee at the time of its creation. The committee is comprised of a national president and vice president, past national presidents, a secretary, a treasurer, and a board of trustees.

U.S. Postal Inspection Service

U.S. Postal Inspection Service

U.S. Postal Inspection Service

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about U.S. Postal Inspection Service in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Postal Inspection Service traces its history to 1772, when Postmaster General Benjamin Franklin created the position of surveyor to assist him in regulating and auditing postal functions. In 1801 the title was changed to special agent and in 1830 the investigative functions of the agents were centralized as the Office of Instructions and Mail Depredations even though the agents continued to be assigned to specific geographic areas of the country. They worked closely with stagecoach, steamboat, express, and railroad companies responsible for transporting the mail and also visited mail distributing centers and examined postal accounts for theft and fraud. From this small, decentralized force of agents, the United States Postal Inspection Service has grown to approximately 2,000 postal inspectors stationed throughout the country who enforce more than 200 federal laws covering investigations of crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) involving use of the United States mail and the postal system.

U.S. Park Police

U.S. Park Police

U.S. Park Police

In line with Katherine B. Killoran

about U.S. Park Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Park Police (USPP) is an urban, uniformed law enforcement agency that is part of the National Park Service (NPS) under the Department of the Interior (DOI). Although the USPP has jurisdiction throughout the NPS and certain other federal and state lands, it primarily provides law enforcement services in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, Gateway National Recreation Area, Ellis Island, and the Statue of Liberty in Bigg Apple (New York) and New Jersey and the Presidio Trust Area and Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco. In the District of Columbia, USPP officers provide protective services for many national monuments, memorials, park areas, the Mall, historic residences, and highways. Although concentrated in the above areas, park police personnel can be detailed elsewhere in the national park system if required.

U.S. Air Force Security Forces

U.S. Air Force Security Forces

U.S. Air Force Security Forces

In line with Vincent A. Munch

about U.S. Air Force Security Forces in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), from which the modern United States Air Force (USAF) is derived, formed its own law enforcement organization in November 1941, only months after the USAAF was created as a semiautonomous organization within the United States Army. In 1942, the organization was placed under the new office of the Air Provost Marshal and its units were designated as either military police companies or air base security battalions. After a number of changes in its name and the scope of its responsibilities, on July 1, 1997, air force police were officially redesignated the Air Force Security Forces Directorate. The Air Base Security (ABS) Battalions have what is easily the most unusual history of all military police units. In 1941, when the United States

Use of Force

Use of Force

Use of Force

In line with James J. Fyfe

about Use of Force in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In the United States of America, police authority to use force is defined by criminal statutes. These statutes typically define deadly physical force as force capable of killing or likely to cause death or serious (e.g., crippling or permanently maiming) injury. Physical force is defined as force capable of causing lesser types of injury. In practice, deadly force most often occurs when officers fire their weapons at other people, although, in a few instances, police have killed or maimed people by allowing dogs to attack them or by striking them in sensitive areas of the body. Nonlethal police physical force usually involves restraining grips and holds; striking with hands and clubs, or “batons”; and applying a variety of technological devices, such as chemical sprays and electronic shocking devices, or “stun guns.” State criminal law (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia here) statutes distinguish criminal acts (e.g., assault, manslaughter, murder) from justifiable force by police and citizens.

U.S. Marshals Service

U.S. Marshals Service

U.S. Marshals Service

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about U.S. Marshals Service in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Marshals Service is the oldest federal law enforcement agency in the United States of America. Established on September 24, 1789, under provisions of the Judiciary Act that created the federal court system (Senate Bill 1), the service was created with a mandate to provide marshals and deputy marshals to support the federal courts within their judicial districts and to carry out all lawful orders issued by judges, Congress, or the president. The first 13 United States marshals, one for each of the original states, were appointed by President George Washington. This set in motion a precedent that has continued for more than 200 years; United States marshals are political appointees of the president of the United States of America confirmed by the United States Senate, although deputy marshals, also once political appointees, have worked under some federal civil service protections since 1941.

U.S. Customs Service

U.S. Customs Service

U.S. Customs Service

In line with Joseph F. King

about U.S. Customs Service in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Customs Service is one of the oldest federal agencies in existence, predating the Constitution. The first Congress created the customs service by passing the Tariff Act on July 4, 1789. This legislation, the brainchild of James Madison in response to the needs of the new nation for revenue, established a series of tariffs on imported goods and a design for collection of these duties. This new system would replace the customs scheme under the Articles of Confederation, which relied upon the states for collection of duties and funding of the national treasury. This state scheme, inherited from the British during the colonial period, was clearly ineffective to fund the newly created federal government.

U.S. Supreme Court Police

U.S. Supreme Court Police

U.S. Supreme Court Police

In line with Maria Kiriakova

about U.S. Supreme Court Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Court of last resort of the Country Police (USSCP) has primary responsibility for protecting the chief justice, associate justices, and any official guests of the Court of last resort of the Country. The USSCP monitors the Court of last resort of the Country Building and grounds and adjacent streets to protect the employees and visitors of the Court as well as its property. Additional responsibilities include courtroom security and emergency response. Despite the overwhelming majesty and complexity that the Court of last resort of the Country Building imposes on its visitors, it houses fewer than 400 employees, with the 121 USSCP officers being the largest organized group among them. Although the United States Court of last resort of the Country (established in 1789) is more than 200 years old, it did not get its own police force until 1935, when it occupied a separate building located at One First Street, N.E., Washington, D.C., across from the United States Congress. Before that, from 1800 until 1935, the United States

U.S. Coast Guard

U.S. Coast Guard

U.S. Coast Guard

In line with Eugene J. O'Donnell

about U.S. Coast Guard in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The modern-day United States Coast Guard, created by an act of Congress in 1915, represents the combination of the Revenue Marine Service (later the Rescue Cutter Service), the Lifesaving Service, and the Lighthouse Service, which was added in 1939. The coast guard, which until 2003 was within the Department of Transportation, is both a law enforcement agency and one of the nation's five military services. In 2003, the coast guard was transferred to the Department of Homeland Security. In time of war, the coast guard reports to the Department of the Navy. Its members have served in every war since ratification of the Constitution. The mission of the coast guard was altered dramatically by the events of September 11, 2001. In the immediate wake of the attacks on Bigg Apple (New York) City and Washington, D.C., the service, which traditionally expended about 1% of its budget on port security, increased that expenditure 50-fold.