Tag Archives: VI

Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act

Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act

Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act

In line with Amy D'Olivio

about Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act was first referred to the House Committee on Judiciary on October 26, 1993, and was eventually signed by President William J. Clinton on September 13, 1994. It became the largest crime fighting bill passed by Congress, with provisions for spending almost $30.2 billion from 1995 through 2000. The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Crime Control Bill) (Publ. L. No. 103-322) amended the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, the first federal program deliberately designed as a block grant to assist state and local law enforcement agencies in crime reduction. The Crime Control Bill was a comprehensive bill that affected a variety of crime-fighting legislation. There was grant funding to be dispersed across governments and agencies, in addition to many substantive provisions.

Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994

In line with Lisa A. Williams

about Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act was first referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary on October 26, 1993, and was eventually signed by President Clinton on September 13, 1994. It became the largest crime-fighting bill passed by Congress, with provisions for spending almost $30.2 billion from 1995 through 2000. The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Crime Control Bill) (P.L. 103322) amended the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, the first federal program deliberately designed as a block grant to assist state and local law enforcement agencies in crime reduction. The Crime Control Bill was a comprehensive bill that affected a variety of crime-fighting legislation. There was grant funding to be dispersed across governments and agencies, in addition to many substantive provisions.

Virginia v. Moore

Virginia v. Moore

Virginia v. Moore as a Leading U.S. Case

Virginia v. Moore is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Virginia v. Moore may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Virginia v. Moore tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Virginia v. Moore is also explained, together with the relevance of Virginia v. Moore impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Virginia v. Moore

553 U.S. 164 (2008)

Violence against Women Act

Violence against Women Act

Violence against Women Act

In line with Jason Mazzone

about Violence against Women Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Responding to the harm to women caused by domestic abuse, rape, stalking, sexual assault, and other forms of violence, in 1994 Congress enacted the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). VAWA contained numerous provisions designed to reduce the frequency of violence against women, to hold perpetrators accountable for their actions, and to provide greater relief to victims. It also authorized $1.62 billion in federal funds over six years for these purposes. The most innovative provision of VAWA created a civil rights remedy allowing victims of violent crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) motivated by gender to bring a legal action against their perpetrators for monetary damages and other relief. However, in 2000, in United States of America v. Morrison , the Court of last resort of the Country of the United States of America held that the civil rights provision of VAWA was unconstitutional. Congress enacted VAWA following extensive hearings on the pervasiveness of violence committed by men in the United States of America against women.

Victims

Victims

Police Response to Victims

In line with Susan Herman

about Victims in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

More than 25 million people in the United States of America become victims of crime every year. The experience can destroy victims' sense of safety and trust in other human beings, and become emotionally and financially devastating. In the aftermath of crime, victims rely on the police-the first responders to crime scenes-for support, information, and guidance through the criminal justice and social service systems. When police are effective gateways to such support, victims are more likely not only to recover from their experience, but also to help police solve crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) and prevent revictimization. Although crime affects individuals in different ways, victims often have similar emotional responses in the hours or days immediately after a crime. Many victims experience a crisis reaction, often with shock and numbness during the initial phase, when most first responders interact with victims.

Vigilantes

Vigilantes

Vigilantes

In line with Dara N. Byrne

about Vigilantes in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Vigilante activity in the United States of America dates as far back as the mid-1700s. Waves of vigilantism spread across the country in order to deal with rising crime rates on the expanding frontier and in gold rush and mining communities around the time of the Civil War. Vigilance committees were usually formed by local men as an attempt at restoring law and order whenever there was an absence of a well-established legal institution or an inadequate law enforcement system. These committees were usually composed of prominent men who banded together to capture, try, and punish those who were perceived as engaging in unlawful activities. Many of their practices included beating, flogging, forced labor, or lynching, depending on the severity of the crime. Vigilantism is often characterized by moblike violence, but it is markedly different because vigilance committees use careful organization, planning, and structure, even if the committee exists only briefly.

Vidocq Society

Vidocq Society

Vidocq Society

In line with Larry E. Sullivan

about Vidocq Society in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

A number of former and present law enforcement professionals founded the Vidocq Society in 1990 to solve cold cases. The society was aptly named after Eugène-François Vidocq (1775-1857), a master criminal who was active in France in the early 19th century. Vidocq was so clever at his trade that the city of Paris made him its Chief of Detectives (1809-27, 1832). He became legendary in the annals of crime and punishment, and a number of novelists modeled characters after him, including Emile Gaboriau's police officer M. Lecoq. Most famously, Honoré de Balzac supposedly based his master criminal, Vautrin, who appears throughout Le Comédie Humaine , on Vidocq's life.