Tag Archives: WI

Will v. Michigan Department of State Police

Will v. Michigan Department of State Police

Will v. Michigan Department of State Police as a Leading U.S. Case

Will v. Michigan Department of State Police is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Will v. Michigan Department of State Police may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Will v. Michigan Department of State Police tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Will v. Michigan Department of State Police is also explained, together with the relevance of Will v. Michigan Department of State Police impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Will v. Michigan Department of State Police

491 U.S. 58 (1989)

Wildlife

Wildlife

Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Law Enforcement

In line with Katherine B. Killoran

about Wildlife in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The mission of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is to conserve, protect, and enhance fish and wildlife. This involves managing ecosystems, saving endangered species, protecting migratory birds, preserving habitat, and promoting wildlife conservation. The FWS is also responsible for enforcing laws, regulations, and treaties that relate to wildlife resources. In 2003, the service received an annual budget of approximately $1.27 billion with a proposed increase in 2004 of $25 million. To support the service's mission, the Division of Law Enforcement (DLE) investigates wildlife crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary), regulates wildlife trade, improves public understanding and compliance with wildlife protection laws, and collaborates with international, state, and tribal law enforcement agencies to conserve and protect wildlife resources. To fulfill this mission, the DLE is involved in investigatory, enforcement, educative, and monitoring functions.

Witness Protection

Witness Protection

Federal Witness Protection Program

In line with Kimberly Collica

about Witness Protection in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Federal Witness Protection Program, also known as the Federal Witness Security (WITSEC) Program, was authorized by Congress as part of the Organized Crime Control Act of 1970. This program, which was implemented in 1971, is proclaimed to be the government's best tool in combating organized crime, drug-related crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary), terrorism, and other serious law violations. Witnesses receive protection from the United States Marshals Service from the time they testify before a grand jury until the trial is completed. After the trial, witnesses and their family are relocated, given new identities, and provided with monthly stipends. The United States Marshals Service assists protected witnesses in obtaining such services as housing, medical care, job training, and employment. Ninety-seven percent of these witnesses have criminal histories but their recidivism rate is only half of the national average.

State Witness Protection Programs

In line with Kimberly Collica

about Witness Protection in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

With witness intimidation on the rise, the need for states to adopt a formal witness protection program (WPP) has become increasingly important. However, only a handful of states have done so. Some states have tried to model their program after the Federal Witness Security (WITSEC) Program but have been unable to replicate it because of financial deficits. Whereas WITSEC has the United States Marshals at its disposal for safeguarding protected witnesses, most states must rely on local law enforcement for protection. Moreover, whereas WITSEC received an estimated $61.8 million in 1997 from the government, most states are struggling to find money to implement and/or maintain this costly endeavor. States lacking formalized programming may have some counties that have been able to implement small-scale WPPs. Unfortunately, these programs are not under guidelines set forth by the state. They are managed and under the discretion of local law enforcement.

Winston v. Lee

Winston v. Lee

Winston v. Lee as a Leading U.S. Case

Winston v. Lee is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Winston v. Lee may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Winston v. Lee tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Winston v. Lee is also explained, together with the relevance of Winston v. Lee impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Winston v. Lee

470 U.S. 753 (1985)

Wickersham Commission

Wickersham Commission

National Commission on Law Observance and Enforcement (Wickersham Commission)

In line with Carol A. Archbold

about Wickersham Commission in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In 1929 President Herbert Hoover created the National Commission on Law Observance and Enforcement. The commission is often referred to as the Wickersham Commission, named after George W. Wickersham, who served as its chairperson. The commission comprised several leading experts in criminal justice and law in the United States of America at that time. Some of the other members of the Wickersham Commission included Roscoe Pound, Newton D. Baker, Frank Loesch, Paul J. McCormick, Ada L. Comstock, William I. Grubb, William S. Kenyon, Henry W. Anderson, and Monte M. Lemann. The Wickersham Commission was created in response to some of the major crime problems relevant to that time period, including organized crime and Prohibition. To better understand the state of crime and criminal justice in the United States of America, the Wickersham Commission conducted the first federal assessment of crime and the criminal justice system over a two-year time period (1929-1931).

Wilson v. Arkansas

Wilson v. Arkansas

Wilson v. Arkansas as a Leading U.S. Case

Wilson v. Arkansas is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Wilson v. Arkansas may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Wilson v. Arkansas tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Wilson v. Arkansas is also explained, together with the relevance of Wilson v. Arkansas impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Wilson v. Arkansas

514 U.S. 927 (1995)