Undercover Operations

Undercover Operations

Undercover Operations

In line with Michael D. Lyman

about Undercover Operations in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Both traditionally and historically, police undercover operations are one of the best ways for police to learn what is happening in any given criminal environment. Simply put, the undercover officer's job is to watch, listen, and collect evidence of criminal wrongdoing. Doing so will help him or her to obtain, firsthand, the essential information for prosecuting criminal offenders. Undercover work can be used in virtually any criminal enterprise but is typically used in drug investigations. Although generally effective, police officers working in an undercover capacity are undertaking one of the most dangerous police activities. These officers, who typically work under minimal supervision, must be aware, alert, and ready for the unexpected. For decades, armies, governments, and the police have long used undercover agents and informants as tools for criminal investigation. Often referred to as “spies” or “secret agents,” their necessity in criminal investigation is clear.

Undercover Operations

In line with Joseph W. Koletar

about Undercover Operations in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The term undercover operations includes various proactive investigative techniques that require law enforcement officers to assume false identities to observe crime or to create an opportunity for criminal activity to take place. There are many kinds of undercover operations, but all have in common that officers mask their true identities in an effort to uncover criminal activity. Generally, the phrase decoy unit is used when an officer assumes the identity of a victim and the phrase undercover operation is used when an officer assumes the identity of a criminal. A distinct type of undercover operation that involves some surprise deception is termed a sting . Decoy units are more closely associated with street crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) enforcement than with white collar crime and are, therefore, less likely to be used by federal law enforcement officers than by local police.

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