Uniform Crime

Uniform Crime

Uniform Crime Reporting Program

In line with Donald Faggiani

about Uniform Crime in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Introduced in 1930 as the first nationwide system for reporting crime information, the Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR) was established to provide a standardized crime reporting system to aid law enforcement administration, operation, and management. State, city, county, and other law enforcement agencies throughout the United States of America voluntarily submit summary-level reports of crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) known to the police and arrests made by the police to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The UCR is divided into two groups of offenses: Part I and Part II. Part I offenses include both reported incidents and arrests and serve as the primary source for reporting crime rates and monitoring crime trends. The offenses are structured on a scale of presumptive seriousness and represent the national Crime Index. The index includes the violent crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) of murder and manslaughter, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, and property-related offenses of burglary, larceny, motor vehicle theft, and arson.

Uniform Crime Reports

In line with Vincent E. Henry

about Uniform Crime in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Uniform Crime Report (UCR) program, administered by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) since its inception in 1930, is a nationwide system for the collection, analysis, and public reporting of data concerning crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) and arrests reported to police. The UCR program has grown tremendously since 1930, when approximately 400 police agencies in 43 states participated; today, more than 18,000 law enforcement agencies representing jurisdictions in all 50 states participate voluntarily in the UCR program. The program has also undergone a series of enhancements and improvements in its data collection, definition, analysis, and reporting techniques over the years, and in 1989, a dramatically improved National Incident-Based Reporting System was implemented to correct various deficiencies and generally improve the usefulness of UCR as a measure of crime and police activity.

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