U.S. Capitol Police

U.S. Capitol Police

U.S. Capitol Police

In line with David Schulz

about U.S. Capitol Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Capitol Police (USCP) traces its history to John Golding, a watchman who was hired at an annual salary of $371.75 in 1801, a few months after the seat of government had moved from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C. Golding had no specified legal authority or arrest powers other than a citizen's right to temporarily detain a suspect until assistance was provided by the marshal of the District of Columbia. In 1823, a detachment of United States Marines supplemented the watchman during reconstruction of the Capitol, which was completed in 1827, the year that President John Quincy Adams expanded the watch staff to four: James Knotts, J. A. French, Samuel Goldsmith, and Ignatius Wheatley. Their primary duties were to protect members of Congress and to separate vagrants, thieves, and persons of ill reputation from other visitors to the Capitol building.

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