U.S. Postal Inspection Service

U.S. Postal Inspection Service

U.S. Postal Inspection Service

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about U.S. Postal Inspection Service in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Postal Inspection Service traces its history to 1772, when Postmaster General Benjamin Franklin created the position of surveyor to assist him in regulating and auditing postal functions. In 1801 the title was changed to special agent and in 1830 the investigative functions of the agents were centralized as the Office of Instructions and Mail Depredations even though the agents continued to be assigned to specific geographic areas of the country. They worked closely with stagecoach, steamboat, express, and railroad companies responsible for transporting the mail and also visited mail distributing centers and examined postal accounts for theft and fraud. From this small, decentralized force of agents, the United States Postal Inspection Service has grown to approximately 2,000 postal inspectors stationed throughout the country who enforce more than 200 federal laws covering investigations of crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) involving use of the United States mail and the postal system.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.