Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act

Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act

Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act

In line with Amy D'Olivio

about Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act was first referred to the House Committee on Judiciary on October 26, 1993, and was eventually signed by President William J. Clinton on September 13, 1994. It became the largest crime fighting bill passed by Congress, with provisions for spending almost $30.2 billion from 1995 through 2000. The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Crime Control Bill) (Publ. L. No. 103-322) amended the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, the first federal program deliberately designed as a block grant to assist state and local law enforcement agencies in crime reduction. The Crime Control Bill was a comprehensive bill that affected a variety of crime-fighting legislation. There was grant funding to be dispersed across governments and agencies, in addition to many substantive provisions.

Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994

In line with Lisa A. Williams

about Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act was first referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary on October 26, 1993, and was eventually signed by President Clinton on September 13, 1994. It became the largest crime-fighting bill passed by Congress, with provisions for spending almost $30.2 billion from 1995 through 2000. The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Crime Control Bill) (P.L. 103322) amended the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, the first federal program deliberately designed as a block grant to assist state and local law enforcement agencies in crime reduction. The Crime Control Bill was a comprehensive bill that affected a variety of crime-fighting legislation. There was grant funding to be dispersed across governments and agencies, in addition to many substantive provisions.

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