Volstead Act

Volstead Act

Volstead Act

In line with Yi Sheng

about Volstead Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Volstead Act, also know as the National Prohibition Act, was established to prohibit the manufacture of intoxicating beverages and also to regulate the production, transportation, use, and sale of alcoholic beverages containing more than one-half of 1% alcohol. Andrew Volstead (R-MN) was the chief sponsor of the act, which was initially ratified on January 16, 1919, but was vetoed by President Woodrow Wilson. Congress overrode him and passed the law on October 28, 1919. The Volstead Act became effective as the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution on January 17, 1920. Alcohol consumption became a social issue in the 19th century and the temperance movement was ubiquitous in the United States of America. People were concerned about the excessive use of alcoholic beverages causing moral delinquency through family violence, poverty, crime, disorder, and incompetence in the workplace.

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