Women

Women

Women in Federal Agency Law Enforcement

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about Women in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The modern history of women special agents in federal law enforcement agencies began in 1971, when President Richard M. Nixon issued Executive Order No. 11478. The order, Equal Employment Opportunity in the Federal Government, prohibited discrimination in employment at the federal level because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap, or age and effectively ended the ban on employing women in the title of special agent. It also opened up to women positions in GS-1811 status, or criminal investigative positions, from which they had previously been barred. Agencies that hired women that same year included the Secret Service and the Postal Inspection Service. Others, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), did not implement this change until 1972.

Women in Federal Law Enforcement

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about Women in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Women in Federal Law Enforcement (WIFLE) began in 1978 as the Interagency Committee on Women in Federal Law Enforcement (ICWIFLE), a task forced formed by the United States Office of Personnel Management to study the reasons women were not becoming or remaining federal law enforcement officers. In 1983 its sponsorship was transferred to the Department of Justice and the Department of the Treasury, with each agency represented by a cochair. In June 1999, leaders of the group decided to achieve greater independence by incorporating outside the interagency committee and changed the group's name to Women in Federal Law Enforcement.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.